A latest research indicates that playing video games for a limited amount of time each week may provide benefits to children, but too much can be detrimental. The findings are published in the Annals of Neurology.
                       

Now a day is there any children who don’t love to play video games. Every types of human being love to play video games. Researchers have found both benefits and bad effects of playing video games to child and teens.

A latest research indicates that playing video games for a limited amount of time each week may provide benefits to children, but too much can be detrimental.The findings are published in the Annals of Neurology.

There's much debate over the potential benefits and risks of video gaming in children and teens. To provide some clarity, Jesus Pujol, MD, of the Hospital del Mar in Spain, and his colleagues investigated the relationship between weekly video game use and certain cognitive abilities and conduct-related problems.


In their study of 2442 children aged 7 to 11 years, the researchers found that playing video games for one hour per week was associated with better motor skills and higher school achievement scores, but no further benefits were observed in children playing more than two hours each week.


The team also found that weekly time spent gaming was steadily linked with conduct problems, peer conflicts, and reduced social abilities, with such negative effects being especially prominent in children who played nine or more hours of video games each week.


"Video gaming per se is neither good nor bad, but its level of use makes it so,"said Dr. Pujol.


When the investigators looked at magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brains of a subgroup of children in the study, they noted that gaming was linked with changes in basal ganglia white matter and functional connectivity. "Gaming use was associated with better function in brain circuits critical for learning based on the acquisition of new skills through practice," Dr. Pujolexplained. "Children traditionally acquire motor skills through action,for instance in relation to sports and outdoor games. Neuroimaging research now suggests that training with desktop virtual environments is also capable of modulating brain systems that support motor skill learning."


“Video games change your brain,” according to University of Wisconsin psychologist C. Shawn Green. Playing video games change the brain’s physical structure the same way as do learning to read, playing the piano, or navigating using a map. Much like exercise can build muscle, the powerful combination of concentration and rewarding surges of neurotransmitters like dopamine strengthen neural circuits that can build the brain.

Video game's good effects to children and teenagers

When your child plays video games, it gives his brain a real workout.  In many video games, the skills required to win involve abstract and high level thinking.  These skills are not even taught at school.  Some of the mental skills enhanced by video games include:


Make kids creative: Video games can make your kid creative. A study by the Michigan State University’s Children and Technology Project found a relation between video game playing and greater creativity,regardless of gender, race or type of video game played. (In contrast, use of cell phones, the Internet and computers other than video games was unrelated to creativity, the study found).


Improve children decision making: Video games can improve your kid’s decision making speed. People who played action-based video and computer games made decisions 25% faster than others without sacrificing accuracy,according to a study from the University of Rochester. Other studies suggests that most expert gamers can make choices and act on them up to six times a second—four times faster than most people.


Work cooperatively: Games that involve multiple players encourage your child to work cooperatively to achieve his goals. Your kid learns to listen to the ideas of others, formulate plans with other kids,and distribute tasks based on skills. Some online games are even played internationally, and this can introduce your kid to players of different nationalities and cultures.  This fosters friendships among different people.


Improve dyslexia: Video games help children with dyslexia read faster and with better accuracy, according to a study by the journal Current Biology. In addition, Spatial and temporal attention also improved during action video game training. Attentional improvement can directly translate into better reading abilities.


Quick thinking, making fast analysis and decisions: Sometimes the player does this almost every second of the game giving the brain a real workout. According to researchers at the University of Rochester, led by Daphne Bavelier, a cognitive scientist, games simulating stressful events such as those found in battle or action games could be a training tool for real-world situations According to Bavelier, “Action game players make more correct decisions per unit time. If you are a surgeon or you are in the middle of a battlefield, that can make all the difference.”


Accuracy:  Action games, according to a study by the University of Rochester, train the player’s brain to make faster decisions without losing accuracy. In today’s world, it is important to move quickly without sacrificing accuracy.


Strategy and anticipation:  Steven Johnson, author of Everything Bad is Good For You: How Today’s Popular Culture is Actually Making Us Smarter, calls this “telescoping.” The gamer must deal with immediate problems while keeping his long-term goals on his horizon.


Situational awareness: Defense News reported that the Army include video games to train soldiers to improve their situational awareness in combat. Many strategy games also require the player to become mindful of sudden situational changes in the game and adapt accordingly.


Developing reading and math skills:  The young gamer reads to get instructions,follow story lines of games, and get information from the game texts. Also, using math skills is important to win in many games that involves quantitative analysis like managing resources.


Agency:  Thanks to all the preceding principles, players feel a real sense of agency and control.They have a real sense of ownership over what they are doing. Such ownership is rarer in school.


Perseverance In higher levels of a game, the player usually fails the first time around, but he keeps on trying until he succeeds and move on to the next level.


Pattern recognition:  Games have internal logic in them, and the player figures it out by recognizing patterns.


Estimating skills:  Several studies, including one from the US Navy, have shown mental benefits of gaming.  The Navy found that gamers scored about 15% better on cognitive and perceptual testing. It is believed that gaming helps develop both abilities to control focus on stimuli and problem solving skills. 


Inductive reasoning and hypothesis testing:  James Paul Gee, professor of education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says that playing a video game is similar to working through a science problem. Like a student in a laboratory, the gamer must come up with a hypothesis. For example, the gamer must constantly try out combinations of weapons and powers to use to defeat an enemy.  If one does not work, he changes hypothesis and try the next one.  Video games are goal-driven experiences, says Gee, which are fundamental to learning.


Following instructions:  Video games can teach children to follow instruction and learn work as directed by the instructions.


Problem solving and logic:  When a child plays a game such as The Incredible Machine, Angry Birds or Cut The Rope, he trains his brain to come up with creative ways to solve puzzles and other problems in short bursts


Hand-eye coordination, fine motor and spatial skills: In shooting games, the character may be running and shooting at the same time. This requires the real-world player to keep track of the position of the character,where he/she is heading, his speed, where the gun is aiming, if the gunfire is hitting the enemy, and so on. All these factors need to be taken into account,and then the player must then coordinate the brain’s interpretation and reaction with the movement in his hands and fingertips.


Planning, resource management and logistics: The player learns to manage resources that are limited, and decide the best use of resources, the same way as in real life.  This skill is honed in strategy games such as Sim City, Age of Empires, and Railroad Tycoon


Multitasking, simultaneous tracking of many shifting variables and managing multiple objectives:  In strategy games, for instance, while developing a city, an unexpected surprise like an enemy might emerge. This forces the player to be flexible and quickly change tactics.


Mapping:  The gamer use in-game maps or build maps on his head to navigate around virtual worlds.


Memory:  Playing first person shooter games such as Call of Duty and Battlefield series enables the player to effectively judge what information should be stored in his working memory and what can be discarded considering the task at hand, according to a study published in the Psychological Research.

Cognitive researcher Daphne Bavalier talks about how video games can help us learn, focus and, fascinatingly, multitask.



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